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Showing content with the highest reputation since 01/17/2020 in all areas

  1. 10 points
    I was able to get out into the desert a while back to hit one of my old patches with the Minelab GPZ 7000. This was a spot I had done really well over the years with the GPX machines and taken a lot of nuggets from. Most of the pieces were less than 3 grams, but a few were in the ¼ and ½ oz. range. I knew it would be a great spot for the 7000 because all the easy, obvious targets were gone, and I thought most all the trash would be too…at least that’s what I thought. Within five minutes I picked up my first nugget. I use the term nugget loosely because it probably only weighed 0.1g. I kept spiraling around the hillside and was blown away by how many small bits of trash were still left. Some of the wire fragments that sounded off on the GPZ blew me away; I could barely see them in my hand! I even found a target in one of my old dig holes. Most of what I pulled from the old patch was trash, but I did walk away with 18 nuggets for a grand total of about 6-grams. Not too shabby. The GPZ is a heavy machine, and to be honest I still prefer the “feel” of my GPX, especially when putting in long days. However, if you don’t mind digging lots of holes chasing small targets, the 7000 will pull even the tiniest nuggets at amazing depths. I was totally impressed...Now only if they can get the electronics of a 7000 inside an Equinox housing! Happy hunting everyone – stay safe!
  2. 9 points
    This amazing find comes from another great friend and customer. He recently scored this beautiful 10-grammer with his Minelab GPZ 7000 here in Arizona. From the short video clip he also sent, the hole looked at least about 20” deep, maybe more. What a gorgeous nugget – well done!!! I wanted to personally thank everyone that has been sending me photos of their recent finds. Not only do I love seeing this stuff, I know our forum & social media followers do too! Please keep them coming!
  3. 9 points
    This beautiful spread of nuggets was found recently by a good friend of mine here in the southwest. He said that the entire patch fit inside a 200 square-foot oval piece of ground. Everything was found with his Minelab GPZ 7000. The nuggets all appear to be fairly rough with some attached host rock. What amazes me is the variation in color amongst the gold. Some nuggets appear more orangish suggesting copper, while the others look to have more silver in them. It makes me wonder if everything came from the same vein, or if perhaps there were several different stringers that all combined to form the patch. Either way this is a heck of a nice haul and it couldn’t have happened to a better guy! He asked to remain anonymous, so I won’t say much other than he is a true inspiration. He is dealing with some major health issues that would have had most folks bed ridden and depressed. Instead he is out there digging holes in the desert making the most out of each day. He is an amazing guy whom I’m proud to call a friend. As the Ozzies would say, “Good on ya mate!”
  4. 8 points
    Chris Gholson

    Customer's GPZ finds!

    Here is a great testimonial I just got from a very happy customer. He picked up the Minelab GPZ 7000 a while back and is off to an amazing start! I sure appreciate the feedback and the great photos. Keep up the good work! “Hi Chris, been out with the 7000 four times now. 6 grams the first trip, nothing the 2nd trip, found the quartz/gold specimen on the 3rd trip, and 5 grams on the last trip. Been real happy with the 7000, finding more gold than ever before!”
  5. 6 points
    Chris Gholson

    Some Fun Au Facts

    Here are a few fun facts about our favorite precious metal. If anyone has more, please feel free to add. Have a great weekend everyone! One ounce of gold can be stretched into a wire more than 40 miles long! Gold can be worked into a layer measuring 1 millionth of an inch. Did you know that one (1) gram of gold contains 305,760,000,000,000,000,000 atoms of gold! Did you know that one (1) ounce of pure gold contains 9,510,200,000,000,000,000,000 gold atoms! 250,000,000 atoms of gold placed side-by-side would make a line approximately one inch long! The average gold content in the earth’s crustal rocks is about 0.005 parts per million (ppm) and in seawater at about 0.000012 ppm. The total amount of gold ever mined is approximately 3.8 billion ounces. More than half of that has been mined since 1850. If all the gold mined over the last 6,000 years were gathered and melted down, it would form a cube with sides of no more than 20 yards. Gold is completely recyclable. In fact, nearly all of the gold found during the past 6,000 years is still in use. Think about it, the gold in your wedding band or watch could have been mined by the ancient Egyptians, plundered from the Incas, or panned out by one of the original 49’ers - you never know! Gold is a good conductor of electricity and is the most malleable and ductile of all metals. Gold’s most important use is in computers, weaponry and aerospace. It is used where consistent, reliable performance under all conditions is essential. The electronics industry has tried to find substitute metals and alloys, but gold’s exceptional resistance to corrosion and tarnish is still unequaled. This durability accounts for the almost perfect condition of coins and artifacts fashioned from it thousands of years ago.
  6. 6 points
    Chris Gholson

    Social Distance Gold

    Hi Everyone, I hope all of you are doing well and keeping your sanity during this crazy virus lockdown. It’s been slow at the shop, so I’ve been spending a bit of time out in the sunshine chasing gold with my detector. What a perfect hobby for social distancing! Here are a few nuggets that I picked up earlier this month. They were all found with the GPX-4500 and Nugget Finder 15” EVO Coil. They were all very deep and in places I had walked before. The only thing I can guess is that prior to my visit it had really rained out there in the desert. The surface was dry, but down a few inches the soil still had moisture in it, so I’m guessing that helped carry the signal and make these nuggets easier to hear. Check out the weird toothpick shaped piece! I was totally convinced it was going to be a nail; instead I got a nice surprise. Total weight for the hunt was about 6-grams. I’ve also been getting some great customer finds photos which I will also be posting up soon. Stay safe out there everyone & happy hunting!
  7. 6 points
    Chris Gholson

    First day out with the GPZ 7000

    A customer and friend that just bought a new Minelab GPZ 7000 from me was nice enough to send over the photos below. His first day out he scored seven nuggets for a total weight of approx. 6-grams! A pocketful of gold with a new unit is always worth celebrating. Congratulations to this prospector on a great first run. Thank you again for the business and for sharing your finds - keep up the good work!
  8. 5 points
    A customer of mine over in the California just texted me this photo of an awesome find. He hiked way down into the bottom of a canyon and was hunting the bedrock along the river when he came across a good signal. After quite a bit of digging & chipping, out pops this incredible medallion! The characters appear to be Chinese, but I’ve never seen anything like it. It’s not rusty either, so I’m wondering what type of metal it might be. If anyone out there has any ideas as to what it could be, he would certainly enjoy hearing them.
  9. 5 points
    This is one of those stories I would have never believed, had it not happened to me. I have been metal detecting for over 20 years and I can honestly say this is one of my biggest surprise finds ever! It started early one Saturday morning in July. I decided to brave the Arizona heat and go check out a place I had spotted on Google Earth. What I saw on the screen sure looked like the remains of several old buildings. Was this an early homestead, an abandoned ranch, or maybe something from the days of the railroad? I had no clue who had lived there, but I sure hoped they had left behind some silver coins or cool relics for me to find. The road getting in was dirt, but I didn't need 4WD and I easily found the spot. Sure enough, there were two crumbling foundations from what were likely small houses. Based on the look of the concrete and the trash lying about, I dated the site to roughly the 1930's. All of the usual rusty garbage was there, and unfortunately so was a layer of modern day junk. It was obvious from the stone fire rings and countless shell casings, that this was a popular hunt camp. I decided to start in what I dubbed the "parking lot". It was a nice flat area in front of the foundations that looked the most likely to hide coins. I fired up my Minelab CTX 3030 and went to work. Even with a low level of discrimination, the machine was blanking out virtually everywhere. I knew I would miss targets, but I figured I would try to cherry pick the most obvious signals first. About ten minutes into it, I get a mixed-up sound beside a bush. As I swept the coil, the threshold blanked out, then gave a clipped high tone. The target ID came up as 12-40. I envisioned a silver coin near the surface surrounded by garbage. Using the side of pick I scrapped away about two inches of the loamy soil. The target moved immediately, which I didn't consider a good sign. I sifted through the dirt until I found the source of the signal; a smooth, heavy slug of metal. It was gray to brassy in color, and was covered in dark spots, almost as if it had been burned. I rubbed off some of the grime and noticed its' surface was pitted and deeply scratched. I assumed it was a molten blob of lead or brass and slid it into my pocket. I continued my day, never giving a second thought to the weird lump of metal. My new spot didn't turn out to be the relic bonanza I had hoped for. I found a handful of old buttons and a few clasps, but not a single coin. When I got home later that evening I was disappointed to tell my wife and daughter that I hadn't found anything good. As I emptied out my pockets onto the table, my daughter asked, "What's this?" holding up the mystery metal blob. "No clue." I replied. She wandered over to the sink and held it under the water. "It almost looks like gold." "Yeah right," I scoffed. "No I'm serious!" she replied. I took it from her outstretched hand and held it up to the light...she was right. I got into the cabinet and took down my digital scale. I dropped it on and the scale responded 14.8-grams. I hefted it a few times in my hand. God, this thing was dense! It was a convincing color and weight, but that was impossible! The nearest gold country was over 50 miles away! Unable to accept the evidence that was piling up, I went back to the cabinet, this time for my 30X light scope. "Do you think it could be?" she asked. "Ha ha, I wish! How cool would that be!?" I grinned as I lowered my eye to the scope. I adjusted the focus and literally couldn't believe what I saw below. It was gold - solid gold! I looked closer, down into the bright yellow crevices and could see sugary crystals of quartz and patches of limonite. This was, without a shadow of a doubt, a genuine, authentic gold nugget! I have had many incredible finds over the past twenty years. Some have been nuggets much larger than this, but this is the first time I have ever struck native gold while hunting for coins! It makes no sense at all, but there you have it. A half-ouncer, found with the CTX 3030 in the middle of a parking lot surrounded by broken beer bottles and spent cartridges. Definitely one of the most bizarre, and amazing surprises of my life. P.S. The pics show before and after cleaning in a mild acid.
  10. 5 points
    Chris Gholson

    Hot weekend relic hunt

    I hope everyone here had a wonderful Fourth of July holiday weekend! It was so hot down in the desert I decided to head for the higher elevation to do some detecting with my Minelab CTX 3030. Years ago while hiking out of a canyon I spotted a place where it looked like someone may have had a small campsite. There weren’t many clues, only a couple rusty cans and a few bits of scattered broken glass, so it definitely wasn’t a permanent camp. Because it was such a tight area it didn’t take long to hunt out. I came up with a collection of nails, two harmonica reeds, and the best find was this 1902 Liberty Nickel. Often called V nickels, these coins were minted from 1883-1912 and are about 75% copper…I hope all of you are out there swinging and staying safe - happy hunting!
  11. 5 points
    My buddy Dean and I headed out this week to go explore some new country. It’s still too hot down in the desert to look for gold, so we went scouting for some coin & relic spots. Our hiking paid off when we stumbled onto the remains of an old rock house hidden in a canyon. The house looked to be from the late 1800’s, but based on the mixture of trash, it was apparent that it may have been inhabited up unto the 1940s. There was a ton of metallic junk everywhere, so it was really slow going. I picked my way through what seemed like hundreds of targets, until a nice high tone caught my attention. It ended up being a silver dime; our first coin of the day! After that the goodies started to come a little quicker. Unfortunately by 1:00 the clouds rolled in and the rain started to fall. We finished off the morning with: two silver Rosie’s, a couple of Wheat cents, a Buffalo nickel, and a beautiful 1945 Mercury dime. I was swinging the Minelab CTX 3030, and he used the Deus. It was a fun spot that should hopefully produce a few more good finds in the future. Happy hunting everyone - enjoy the weekend!
  12. 5 points
    Chris Gholson

    Beautiful 1-oz Specimen!

    I thought you guys would enjoy seeing this gorgeous gold & quartz specimen a friend of mine found not long ago with the GPZ 7000 he bought from me. He recovered many more from the spot, but to me this was one of the prettier pieces. A big congratulations to this lucky finder, please send me more photos!
  13. 5 points
    Chris Gholson

    Freshly Dug Desert Gold!

    A good friend spent a couple of weeks out in the Arizona desert social distancing and swinging his Minelab GPZ 7000 metal detector. The photo below is of all the gold he found, which totals over an ounce. The two biggest nuggets combined weighed in at 14-grams. Congratulations on your success, you added some beautiful pieces to the collection! Thank you again for letting me share with everyone.
  14. 4 points
    I was able to get out this past weekend with my buddy Dean for a morning of coin/relic hunting. It’s still so hot here in Arizona that you have to get out there super early, otherwise by noon you are cooking! We got in a couple solid hours of detecting and came up with a few cool finds. The metal cap gun was buried about 8” deep and almost gave me a heart attack! As I was down in the hole sweeping away dirt with my fingers the outline of a trigger guard appeared. Then, I swept a bit more aside and saw a handle. My adrenaline was pumping, I had found a pistol!!! (or at least I thought). Once out of the hole I quickly realized what it was. Not the outlaw gun I had initially thought, but still a pretty cool find. This one was made by Hubley Manufacturing Company of Lancaster, PA which was incorporated in 1894. This gun was not that old, but I am thinking perhaps the late 1940’s. The other interesting discoveries were the two metal pieces on the left side of the photo. These are Tent Slips, or a Tensioner. They are typically made of brass and were an integral part of setting up camps in the wilderness. From what I see online and it looks like they were patented in the 1880’s and used by the military, railroad builders, miners, etc. I also found a tiny silver buckle, a 1941 Wheatie, two harmonica reeds, and the back to a pocket watch. All found with the CTX 3030 and 11” coil. I hope all of you are well and surviving the summertime heat - stay safe out there!
  15. 4 points
    Chris Gholson

    Treasures from up North

    Last month one of my customers and friends came down from Montana for a visit and to try his luck on the Arizona goldfields. He had done plenty of metal detecting back home with his Minelab Equinox 800, and found plenty of gold, just none of it in the form of nuggets. He brought just a small portion of his impressive collection of finds from the parks, ballfields, and old home sites. He had found some beautiful rings and some cool old coins, like an 1887 silver Morgan…He let me snap a few photos so I could share with you all. Thanks again Gary! I hope everyone enjoyed the holidays and 2020 is off to a great start!
  16. 3 points
    Chris Gholson

    His First GPX Nugget

    I received another photo from a customer over in California that purchased a Minelab GPX 5000 from me. He had a couple of skunk days, but stuck with it and was rewarded with this lovely chunk of gold! Thanks for the business and letting me share your success! “Hi Chris, this is my first nugget with the 5000! It took me four trips, but it paid off. Thanks for all your help!”
  17. 2 points
    Chris Gholson

    Most EVO's in Stock

    I got a batch of the EVOLUTION Coils by Nugget Finder in from Australia. With all the virus stuff going on it is really slowing up the shipping, but I have most all sizes in stock. The only exception is the new 25" Mono. Those sold out immediately, but I will have more coming soon. For our forum members, I am offering FREE SHIPPING and a FREE Backup Skid Plate with each order. f you are looking to boost the performance of your Minelab GPX, GP, or SD gold detector, the EVO Coils are a great option...Have a good weekend all!
  18. 2 points
    DOC

    Is it really better? You decide!

    Some posters on other forums rightly questioned whether the Gold SPOT Treasure Scoop was really any better than a regular treasure scoop. Well, I already knew the answer to that question. You see for a year I have been working on the Gold SPOT design. I played with it I re-designed it, I proto-typed it 5 times. I wanted a design that would speed up nugget recovery and make it easier to keep the nugget in the scoop and not lose it. Remember, I'm the guy who had a catastrophic failure with the SAGA swing arm, and within days of release, I recalled them all from the field. They just did not perform as they were supposed to. I went back to the drawing board and sunk thousands more dollars into redesigning and perfecting the SAGA. I won't sell something unless I know it is a significant improvement over anything on the market. But just to show you what I already know, I decided to do a little impromptu video, an experiment. The video is unedited, except for the very end where I panned across an invoice with a customer's address on it that was sitting on the shipping table, I clipped that out. Watch the Gold SPOT in action and see what you think. Not to over-hype the Gold SPOT but one of the unique features of this scoop is that you can "HEAR" the gold. I know that sounds like an outrageous claim, but let me explain. When you get down to a small amount of dirt in a regular scoop along with a nugget and you agitate the scoop back and forth, the nugget does nothing but slide back and forth on the smooth bottom of the scoop. When you get down to a small amount of dirt in the Gold SPOT along with the nugget and you agitate the scoop the nugget rattles back and forth in the trough or channel clicking against the sides of the channel. Cool, right? I know we are getting quite a few Gold SPOTs out in the field and I would like to hear some feedback. Although if you are like me you are probably staying in out of the heat. -Doc
  19. 2 points
    Found one a few weeks back, its a Chinese weight scale weight...
  20. 2 points
    Hi All, I wanted to share some info from Minelab about upgrades that are coming to the SDC 2300 gold detector. Below are the new changes: NEW FEATURES SDC 2300 The SDC 2300s will now include: Re-designed headphones Armrest protector Rechargeable Lithium-ion battery A clip-on coil joint protector has been added to the swivel joint for added protection of the coil joint while detecting. All new accessories are compatible with existing SDC 2300s purchased before the ship date and may be purchased individually.
  21. 2 points
    Chris Gholson

    Grateful this Memorial Day

    This Memorial Day remember and honor all who have served and sacrificed for our freedom. “As we express our gratitude, we must never forget that the highest appreciation is not to utter the words, but to live by them.” -John F. Kennedy
  22. 2 points
    I just got word from the owner that he was able to find someone to translate. It reads "Invest a Little - Receive Great Wealth". Good bit of advice for gold prospectors, how cool!
  23. 1 point
    dick ward

    Freshly Dug Desert Gold!

    Social distancing at its very best!! Way to go, beautiful bunch of nuggets.
  24. 1 point
    bitster98

    Claim search

    Gerard , thank you so much!!! That's what I'm going to buy . I have had the same experience dropping mine off my ramp style carrier granted it was rough going where I was but sucked none the less. Also the carrier I been using weighs 100 lbs & ratchet straps suck. Man I really appreciate your post & advice!!!! Thank you so much!!! Have a wonderfull evening and lots of yellow in your future!!!! Joe.
  25. 1 point
    I’m not sure if you guys caught this story yet, but on Sunday morning residents living in central Arizona (myself included) were awakened by a loud boom. This was actually a sonic boom caused by a falling meteorite. At this point, no one knows exactly where it landed, but there are quite a few folks out there swinging their metal detectors trying to find it. Hopefully as more witnesses come forward it will help in determining where it may have hit. I will definitely keep you all posted if I hear anything more. PRESCOTT, AZ (3TV/CBS 5) -- A blasting sound and odd sight in the sky startled some people in Northern Arizona and the Valley Sunday morning. Planetary science field researcher Robert Ward said, “We had a meteorite enter the atmosphere at 20- 22,000 miles per hour.” His cameras were able to capture a speck in the sky around 7:20 a.m. “I immediately jumped out of bed with the whole sonic boom,” Ward said. “I grab my phone. I ran outside. The sonic boom created a 3.1 reading on the Richter scale, so that’s a fairly sizable event.” That’s what led Ward to believe the meteor was roughly the size of a microwave. “We need time to dig into that footage, look at other cams,” he said. “Our partners at American Meteor Society will triangulate that data using eyewitness accounts that people are actually gathering in the community.” Brothers Abraham, 8, Zeke, 10, and Judah, 11, described seeing something move through the sky surrounded by a green hue. "We were looking out the window,” said Zeke. “Then we see this thing flying fast, and then it started glowing." American Meteor Society expert Rob Lunsford said the green tint was most likely because the meteor was made of nickel. Researchers want to hear from other people who saw and heard the meteor event Sunday morning. Contact the American Meteor Society.
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