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SDC vs GPX gold size/type visual comparison.

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I thought that this little visual comparison between gold found with the SDC and gold found with the GPX is interesting, although, not surprising. O.K., yes.... I'm totally bored :mellow:. Anyway, here it is....

 

post-36139-0-67407800-1488052864_thumb.jpg

SDC gold.

 

post-36139-0-30050300-1488052890_thumb.jpg

GPX gold.

 

The SDC seems to find a lot more of the flat stuff. I believe that is because it can "see" the flat stuff "on edge", whereas, the GPX ...not so much. Even with the Sadie coil attached to the GPX. No real surprise there.

 

Not surprisingly, the GPX has an affinity for the chunkier " three dimensional" nuggets, although, I believe the SDC would hit those as well if in range depth-wise. There isn't much the SDC misses... if in range. Some of those nugs won't weigh on my scale.

 

The surprising thing to me, though, is the number of specie finds with the GPX compared to the SDC. If you look closely at the picture of the GPX nugs around the bottom of the dime they are all small species. I think that there is only one found with the SDC. The SDC is supposed to be better at finding the prickly, odd shaped, porous specie type gold.

 

Both machines certainly fill a niche. If you are considering purchasing either of these machines, consider the following: The SDC is the "skunk buster". Since the goal is to find gold every time you go out... the SDC is the machine that will put you nearest that goal. If you like to cover more ground and find bigger gold (and don't mind the skunk now and then) the GPX is the way to go. But, most of you already knew that.This is a comparative pictorial to verify what you already knew :huh:.

 

I don't have comparison pics of GPZ gold because I don't have a GPZ. I am taking donations though :P.

 

Dean

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Hi Mike,

You have the deadly combo going :ph34r: and you are a skilled operator . Those poor nugs don't stand a chance! The 5K won't leave much behind especially if one utilizes the various smaller coils and hunts carefully as the patch thins out. The SDC is perfect for "clean up" duty behind the 5K.

 

Dean

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I like the collection and the comparison.

 

I’m new to the GPX and I have noticed occasionally it will “lose” small, flat pieces after I’ve dug it out of the hole. I do think that they turned sideways just like you said. Unfortunately, I can’t seem to put a detector over a place that has anything but trash, so what I am digging up mostly is flat pieces of rust. I got excited to find a wash around here that was so dirty, but so far I’ve gotten no gold out of it, but a lot of rust.

 

Perhaps someone was over this wash already in Iron Reject mode?

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Chrisski,

Yes, those pesky flat pieces of iron will do that. When that happens to me I just kick the pile around until the piece moves and makes itself heard again.

Larger washes that actually get flowing during a wet cycle are good and bad. Good, because everything becomes concentrated into the wash... like gold. Bad, because everything becomes concentrated in to the wash... like trash. Try hunting the smaller tributaries that drain into a known gold bearing wash. These smaller tributaries are what, most likely, enriched the wash with gold in the first place and usually aren't as trashy. I find that the larger trashy washes, even though they may contain gold, eat up all of your field time digging trash. These areas are best left to a VLF with some discrimination capabilities not a GPX. A small bit of trash here and there is a good indicator that the area wasn't detected well. That's OK. But, when you are hitting trash every few swings, it's time to move on to less trashy ground.

 

Look for small shallow gullies with bedrock evident here and there. Remember, if the area was easy to get to and easy to swing a coil over... it has already been detected many times over. That doesn't mean there isn't gold left there. It means you have to stick your coil where others haven't...under large rocks (move them), under brush, etc.

Always take the path of most resistance. Hope this helps some.

 

Dean

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Babo,

 

 

I think I understand what you're saying about going down the narrow washes. Where I go is an hour drive from 4 million people, so it’ll be very hard to find a place that no one has not been before. Every metal detectorist from that group drives out to this area when he has free time. As I was detecting this wash, I started thinking about you can only go over this once with a GPX, and then the good stuff is gone FOREVER. There will be some replenishment, but nothing for many, many aeons.

 

The wash I’m on has the narrow feeder creeks with trees and other brush that make it real hard to get to. Like you say, that’s where I need to try.

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I thought that this little visual comparison between gold found with the SDC and gold found with the GPX is interesting, although, not surprising. O.K., yes.... I'm totally bored :mellow:. Anyway, here it is....

 

post-36139-0-67407800-1488052864_thumb.jpg

SDC gold.

 

post-36139-0-30050300-1488052890_thumb.jpg

GPX gold.

 

The SDC seems to find a lot more of the flat stuff. I believe that is because it can "see" the flat stuff "on edge", whereas, the GPX ...not so much. Even with the Sadie coil attached to the GPX. No real surprise there.

 

Not surprisingly, the GPX has an affinity for the chunkier " three dimensional" nuggets, although, I believe the SDC would hit those as well if in range depth-wise. There isn't much the SDC misses... if in range. Some of those nugs won't weigh on my scale.

 

The surprising thing to me, though, is the number of specie finds with the GPX compared to the SDC. If you look closely at the picture of the GPX nugs around the bottom of the dime they are all small species. I think that there is only one found with the SDC. The SDC is supposed to be better at finding the prickly, odd shaped, porous specie type gold.

 

Both machines certainly fill a niche. If you are considering purchasing either of these machines, consider the following: The SDC is the "skunk buster". Since the goal is to find gold every time you go out... the SDC is the machine that will put you nearest that goal. If you like to cover more ground and find bigger gold (and don't mind the skunk now and then) the GPX is the way to go. But, most of you already knew that.This is a comparative pictorial to verify what you already knew :huh:.

 

I don't have comparison pics of GPZ gold because I don't have a GPZ. I am taking donations though :P.

 

Dean

 

Great honest post Dean :)

Glad you put this up.

Ill give ya a buck towards your GPZ next time we meet :)

Tom H.

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Babo,

 

 

I think I understand what you're saying about going down the narrow washes. Where I go is an hour drive from 4 million people, so it’ll be very hard to find a place that no one has not been before. Every metal detectorist from that group drives out to this area when he has free time. As I was detecting this wash, I started thinking about you can only go over this once with a GPX, and then the good stuff is gone FOREVER. There will be some replenishment, but nothing for many, many aeons.

 

The wash I’m on has the narrow feeder creeks with trees and other brush that make it real hard to get to. Like you say, that’s where I need to try.

 

Chris: Think outside of the wash..(box) Hit the sides of the washes and look for benches where if flowed a couple thousand years ago. Look for shallow depressions running down the hills.

Good luck to ya.

Tom H.

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