Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
Chris Gholson

Bedrock Hunting Tip

Recommended Posts

Hi Everyone,

 

Here is something I discovered about eight years ago while detecting a gully in Arizona with my SD2100. It was a beautiful gully that was just the right size, about 12 feet wide with many stretches of exposed bedrock. The bedrock was a decomposed schist full of cracks and crevices ideal for trapping gold. I worked the gully several times picking out about 15 little nuggets. After my fourth time down the gully I wasn’t able to turn up another piece.

 

On my way back to the truck I walked across a 5 foot exposure of schist and noticed how all the crevices ran in a particular direction. Some of these crevices ran across the flow of water, others ran with it. This bedrock reminded me of a piece of wood because it had GRAIN. This isn’t a geological term, but that is the word that I think best describes the look of these crevices. The 5-ft. stretch of bedrock I mentioned above had yielded 3 small bits of gold, each weighing no more than 7-8 grains. I had hunted it several times, but each time I was working my coil against the grain of the bedrock. I decided to give it one last shot, this time working my coil with the grain rather than against it.

 

A few passes into it I picked a very subtle response coming from a deep crack. I turned my coil at a 90 degree and swung against the grain – nothing! I moved back with the grain and the soft signal reappeared. I careful removed the contents of the crack and began pouring small amounts on top of the coil. A quick ZIP informed me that something metal had hit the top of the coil. After a few moments of pushing around the soil I spotted a tiny yellow dot, which turned out to be a 3-grainer.

 

I re-hunted the gully once again this time going with the grain whenever possible. I was amazed that by simply moving my coil along with the cracks I scored another 4 nuggets. Granted they were all microscopic, but hey, gold is gold and I don’t like leaving anything behind regardless of size. If you have a few “bedrocky” spots that you have worked in the past, try hitting them again going with the natural grain, you may be surprised. Good luck! :)

 

Pictures below: the red arrow in first photo indicates going with the bedrock grain, the white arrow shows going against the grain. Second photo shows typical dry gold-bearing gully and red arrow indicates general trend of bedrock grain. Last photo shows why we love our metal detectors; some of the gold I've found here in AZ.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good on ya, Chris!

 

Thanx for the informative ditty and nice pics; that's a great fistfull of nuggets. ;) I seem to recall the late great Floyd Allen mention something about detecting with/against the grain in a detecting video production about a decade or so ago... has it been so long? :blink: See ya,

 

- Lunk -

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Lunk,

 

I can't remember if this tip was covered in the Detecting w/ Pros video made 10 years ago or not. I think this little trick can really make a difference on bedrock, and it is something I demonstrate live-to-camera in my new videos. I swing the coil both ways over an intact target in bedrock, going with the grain definitely gives a crisper signal response.

 

It was good chatting with you today. We'll talk more about that coil you're after when I get back from Oz. In the meantime, keep finding those nuggets! ;)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanx, Chris. I'll definitely give that technique a go next time I'm in some good bedrock. Have fun down under!

 

-Lunk -

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Good information, I'll have to remember that one, something that doesn't give a good signal from both directions may not be ground noise, it could be some trapped gold.

 

Rex

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

One other thing about changing the direction that you detect the sometimes very mineralized schist bedrock is that it will sometimes give you false signals in one direction and not the other. By experiment with direction of coil sweep and swing speed , the false signals can be greatly reduced. Learning these little tricks is part of the detecting learning curve . Good post Chris. Many of us do these thing subconciously and fail to mention the value of them to beginners.---Bob

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Great Tip Chris ... nice pixz too!

 

By any chance is the second pic in the general area of LSD? Looks like a place Jay and I spent some time a couple years back! Same place you, Montana, Steve, Jay and I were on one rainy day in January 2005. Just curious.

 

Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Create an account or sign in to comment

You need to be a member in order to leave a comment

Create an account

Sign up for a new account in our community. It's easy!

Register a new account

Sign in

Already have an account? Sign in here.

Sign In Now
Sign in to follow this  

×