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LUNK'S NUGGETSHOOTING SPREE

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Coeur d'Alene Shane: Hey, I thought you might be lurking - yep, finally got a nice one! How's the weather up there? (That's sarcasm, BTW!)

 

Jagdoctor1: Thanx for the kudos.

 

LARGO: You know, I JUST switched to the dinky geologists pick TODAY, because I was getting tired of needlessly wielding the two and a half pound "encumberance" pick to scratch out the shallow dinks, AND LOOK WHAT HAPPENS! It did take quite alot longer to get down a foot and a half with the little diggerdoo; if I had known the nugget was going to be THAT deep, I would have took the short hike up the hill and got the e.p. out of the truck to make short work out of the whole affair. In retrospect, though, it was kind of nice to lollygag and savor the moment of digging a deep nugget!

 

- Lunk -

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A "RIPPA"!!! :lol: Awesome Lunk!

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WOWSA......... sure is a beauty

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Nice piece Lunkster!

Nothing funner than digging a deep target when your just sure its gold!

Gus-

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Alright, thanks guys! :)

 

I'll be without internet access for the next week or two, so I'll be unable to post my finds until then. Before I go however, I'd like to leave you with one last tidbit. During my desert adventures, I have detected many meteorites by visiting known strewn fields; these are areas in which thousands of meteorite fragments have already been found, and more are waiting to be located with a metal detector or by sight. A few years ago, while detecting for gold nuggets near Quartzsite, Arizona, I ran across a meteorite that had fragmented into several pieces which were all laying in an area of about nine square feet. It was subsequently classified by Arizona State University and is listed in the Meteoritical Society's catalog as an official meteorite find called the Diablo Pass Stony Meteorite. This is what is called a FIND in meteorite hunting jargon; it represents a new meteorite, found in an area where no meteorites have been reported before. Finds are extremely rare - more rare than finding a gold nugget, a diamond, or even an emerald. :o Well, as luck would have it, while I was out patch hunting a few days ago, I got a nice target from my GPX-4500; as I glanced down at the ground, my trained eye immediately spotted what was giving the response - a beautiful visitor from outerspace, a stony meteorite! B) This is also a new find, in an area where no other meteorites have been reported; it's an individual whole stone as opposed to a broken fragment, and most exciting is that it is ORIENTED. Oriented means that instead of just tumbling through Earth's atmosphere, this meteorite stabilized in such a way that it developed a leading nose pointed in the direction of flight, as well as a tapered trailing end at the rear of the stone, allowing it to be sculpted by the intense heat of it's passage through the air into a teardrop shape. Oriented meteorites are very rare and represent a find of a lifetime, so I'm pretty stoked! :) I did a little research, and the going rate for an oriented common stony meteorite is around eight dollars per gram, and at seven hundred and seventy grams, my new find is definitely worth a small chunk of change; not too shabby for a day's work! :rolleyes: Chances are that it is a common stone, called an ordinary chondrite in meteorite lingo, but until I get it classified by a meteorite lab, I won't know for sure exactly what type of stone it is. So I encourage everyone to learn how to recognize a meteorite; there are plenty of online resources as well as printed materials that will educate a person on how to quickly identify these extraterrestrial objects in the field; you never know - that next "hot rock" could be worth thousands of dollars, and it's up to you whether it gets kicked aside, tossed into a bush, or recognized for what it truly is: a gem from beyond this world! Below are some pics of different views and closeups of the meteorite - enjoy!

 

- Lunk -

 

* NEW FIND: 770 GRAM ORIENTED METEORITE, INDIVIDUAL STONE

* TOP VIEW SHOWING POLISHED WINDOW REVEALING GRAINS OF NICKEL-IRON METAL OCCURING ONLY IN METEORITES; LEADING NOSE AT TOP OF PIC, TRAILING END AT BOTTOM

* CLOSEUP OF WINDOW SHOWING METAL GRAINS

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More views...

 

* BOTTOM VIEW WITH LEADING NOSE AT TOP AND TRAILING END AT BOTTOM

* RIGHT SIDE VIEW WITH LEADING NOSE AT RIGHT AND TRAILING END AT LEFT

* LEFT SIDE VIEW WITH LEADING NOSE AT LEFT AND TRAILING END AT RIGHT

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More views...

 

* LEADING NOSE

* TRAILING END

* EXTREME CLOSEUP OF WINDOW SHOWING METAL GRAINS AND CHONDRULES, PRESENT ONLY IN METEORITES

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Hi Lunk,

 

Hey, another super find!

 

Yep, those outta space rocks are fun to find, and they are out there if a person is paying attention.

 

Obviously I don't know where you found the thing, but there have been a few finds at the RP area in the last few years.

3 I know of are of similar origin, found by 3 separate individuals. Mine was found up near the upper road, close to where you first tried out your new 4000. It is on the left shown here: http://www.geocities.com/bolidechaser/nvpo...ve/03-10-31.htm

 

And more on mine: http://tin.er.usgs.gov/meteor/metbull.php?code=30754

 

 

Bob Verish, a very noteable meteorite chaser, heard about mine, (courtesy of John B.) had the first 2 finders bring their space rocks to RP, where he could look at them and take the photos shown above. One other smaller meteorite was found by a pro meteorite hunter at a later date in the vicinity.

 

Again, I extend a big atta boy to ya, Lunk for your great find!

 

Gary/LARGO

 

 

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Lunk,I've seen a few small meteorites that were found in the Rye patch area but nothing as nice as the one you found. Thats also a real nice nugget .

Harry

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Lunk. Nice Find!! As dumb as I am about meteorites I'd know that was one. I've seen lots of them at The tucson mineral shows, and I would say you have a super find and probably worth far more than $8.00 a gram . All mine are fragments and virtually worthless . John B. will love to see that one.----Bob

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Lunk,

 

Hey, glad you found two lunkers and one is out of this world. Keep it up!

 

LuckyLundy

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Alright, thanks guys! :)

 

I'll be without internet access for the next week or two, so I'll be unable to post my finds until then. Before I go however, I'd like to leave you with one last tidbit. During my desert adventures, I have detected many meteorites by visiting known strewn fields; these are areas in which thousands of meteorite fragments have already been found, and more are waiting to be located with a metal detector or by sight. A few years ago, while detecting for gold nuggets near Quartzsite, Arizona, I ran across a meteorite that had fragmented into several pieces which were all laying in an area of about nine square feet. It was subsequently classified by Arizona State University and is listed in the Meteoritical Society's catalog as an official meteorite find called the Diablo Pass Stony Meteorite. This is what is called a FIND in meteorite hunting jargon; it represents a new meteorite, found in an area where no meteorites have been reported before. Finds are extremely rare - more rare than finding a gold nugget, a diamond, or even an emerald. :o Well, as luck would have it, while I was out patch hunting a few days ago, I got a nice target from my GPX-4500; as I glanced down at the ground, my trained eye immediately spotted what was giving the response - a beautiful visitor from outerspace, a stony meteorite! B) This is also a new find, in an area where no other meteorites have been reported; it's an individual whole stone as opposed to a broken fragment, and most exciting is that it is ORIENTED. Oriented means that instead of just tumbling through Earth's atmosphere, this meteorite stabilized in such a way that it developed a leading nose pointed in the direction of flight, as well as a tapered trailing end at the rear of the stone, allowing it to be sculpted by the intense heat of it's passage through the air into a teardrop shape. Oriented meteorites are very rare and represent a find of a lifetime, so I'm pretty stoked! :) I did a little research, and the going rate for an oriented common stony meteorite is around eight dollars per gram, and at seven hundred and seventy grams, my new find is definitely worth a small chunk of change; not too shabby for a day's work! :rolleyes: Chances are that it is a common stone, called an ordinary chondrite in meteorite lingo, but until I get it classified by a meteorite lab, I won't know for sure exactly what type of stone it is. So I encourage everyone to learn how to recognize a meteorite; there are plenty of online resources as well as printed materials that will educate a person on how to quickly identify these extraterrestrial objects in the field; you never know - that next "hot rock" could be worth thousands of dollars, and it's up to you whether it gets kicked aside, tossed into a bush, or recognized for what it truly is: a gem from beyond this world! Below are some pics of different views and closeups of the meteorite - enjoy!

 

- Lunk -

 

* NEW FIND: 770 GRAM ORIENTED METEORITE, INDIVIDUAL STONE

* TOP VIEW SHOWING POLISHED WINDOW REVEALING GRAINS OF NICKEL-IRON METAL OCCURING ONLY IN METEORITES; LEADING NOSE AT TOP OF PIC, TRAILING END AT BOTTOM

* CLOSEUP OF WINDOW SHOWING METAL GRAINS

 

 

From one Space Rock hunter to another... that is one hell of a find Lunk! Without a doubt those are meteorites and gorgeous ones at that! Most of us only dream about finds like that. Congratulations and keep your eyes peeled out there because you might be onto a nice sized strewnfield. No telling how much more could be out there.

 

Del

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Lunk: Talking about have a good trip-WOW- super finds--hope you find many more

 

I would keep that Lucky geologist pick close by--just in case :rolleyes:

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Hi Lunk and All

 

Now that's a beauty !! Real nice find !! Your window looks like lots of metal H I presume !! Congrads !! Did you give er the lick test :rolleyes: !! I hate finding space rocks in real cold weather cause they stick to my lips :o !! Happy Huntin John B.

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Wow that is cool! I would rather find that than gold. I have found some chunks in known strewn fields but never a new one. Congrats!

 

 

Howdy to John B too!

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Hi Lunk and All

 

Now that's a beauty !! Real nice find !! Your window looks like lots of metal H I presume !! Congrads !! Did you give er the lick test :rolleyes: !! I hate finding space rocks in real cold weather cause they stick to my lips :o !! Happy Huntin John B.

 

Well John, the moment before my outstretched tongue would have slathered itself all over the suspected meteorite, I caught a glimpse of chondrules and exposed rusty metal grains; so I narrowly averted the lick test! :lol: And you're right; I'm sure it will classify as the high total iron petrologic type. I plan on taking a small diameter core of the interior to send in for the classification...it will be much better than having them ruin an asthetic oriented individual by slicing one of the ends off! :(

 

Paseclipse: I plan on going back to the area next spring to see if I can find more; hopefully there is a strewn field. And thanks to everyone else that responded to my meteorite post. :)

 

OK; I managed to find a few crumbs of gold since my last post, but my hunting partner, the legendary nuggetshooter Smokey Baird, beat me severely by finding over a half ounce of golden beauties in one afternoon with the help of his trusty nugget-pointing dog Buster! Good on you, Smoke!! B)

 

The folks and I are en route to Ridgecrest, California, so hopefully my next post will feature some beautiful gold from the El Paso Mountains...'til then, good luck out there! :)

 

- Lunk -

 

Pics below:

* Smokey Baird admiring his freshly dug handful of nuggets while Buster scans the gravels for more gold!

* Close-up of 10.6 pennyweight fistfull of gold!

* Lunk's latest crumb collection!

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Hey Lunk,

 

Wow, the new meteorite is an incredible find!!! Between the gold and the rock from space, you are off to a great start this season. I can't wait to see the collection when we catch up in March at Stanton. Keep up the good work and be sure to tell the folks hello for me...Happy hunting in CA.

 

P.S. Love the photo of Smokey. Let him know I'll have his pictures shipped back next week.

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Hey Lunk,

 

Wow, the new meteorite is an incredible find!!! Between the gold and the rock from space, you are off to a great start this season. I can't wait to see the collection when we catch up in March at Stanton. Keep up the good work and be sure to tell the folks hello for me...Happy hunting in CA.

 

P.S. Love the photo of Smokey. Let him know I'll have his pictures shipped back next week.

 

I'm looking forward to the AZO Outing as always, Chris; the folks say, "Howdy!", and so does Smokey...hope you and the fam have a great winter - stay warm up there in the high country! :)

 

- Lunk -

 

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