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Jennifer Bond

Sharing your valuable knowledge and extending the enjoyment of your cl

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Topic should read "Editing a post in Sharing your valuable knowledge and extending the enjoyment of your claims"

 

Hi AZO friends.... below is a post that I put up on another forum in response to a person who was talking about his age and getting down to his claims... after writing this response, I felt it may be a good post for here as well.

 

 

 

Hi guys (and gals if there are any here)

These type of situations seem to me a perfect opportunity to help bring younger or less experienced folks into the hobby. I know that I am totally new to all this and have tons of questions about what kind of dirt to spend time on, how to set up the right angle/flow on my high banker, what different type of bedrock are best, etc etc...... I think all of you who call yourselves "Geezers" are doing yourselves a huge disservice and should recognize just how valuable the knowledge that you possess is. In the Amateur/Ham radio hobby, we have what are called "Elmer's", they're basically "Mentors" and are described as follows:

 

----------------

Origin of the term "Elmer"

The term "Elmer"--meaning someone who provides personal guidance and assistance to would-be hams--first appeared in QST in a March 1971 "How's DX" column by Rod Newkirk, W9BRD (now also VA3ZBB). Newkirk called them "the unsung fathers of Amateur Radio." While he probably was not trying to coin a term at the time, here's how Newkirk introduced "Elmer" in his column and, as it turned out, to the rest of the Amateur Radio world:

 

"Too frequently one hears a sad story in this little nutshell: 'Oh, I almost got a ticket, too, but Elmer, W9XYZ, moved away and I kind of lost interest.'"

 

Newkirk went on to say, "We need those Elmers. All the Elmers, including the ham who took the most time and trouble to give you a push toward your license, are the birds who keep this great game young and fresh."--Rick Lindquist, N1RL

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Note: When they say "ticket" above, they are referring to "ham license".

 

Elmer's are an irreplaceable resource to our (Ham/Amateur Radio) community and are critical to keeping the hobby alive, especially with all the other distractions that exist today that are much less work (Internet, Video Games, iPhones etc).

 

I feel that if more of those who feel they have the knowledge to do so, offered to "Elmer" those of us who don't, evangelized the hobby etc it would be mutually beneficial for everyone. When I've had someone who considered themselves acting as my Elmer, it was good for both of us, I assisted when he needed work that he was not comfortable doing due to age (tower work for his antennas etc) and he shared his knowledge and experience that I would have spent a lifetime learning if I ever did learn it.

 

Elmer Links:

http://www.arrl.org/news/features/2004/12/17/1/

http://www.arrl.org/FandES/field/club/mentor/

 

Sorry for babbling, but I hear people on several boards saying "my days are numbered, I'm too old" etc and even selling off equipment at dirt cheap prices and you can hear the depression and sadness in their ads. If there was a claim that I knew someone loved working but was not comfortable going alone or carrying his/her equipment, shoveling etc.. I would gladly offer to exchange the shoveling, carrying etc in return for the knowledge learned from spending a day with years of experience. You've all heard of Big Brothers and Big Sisters.. well how about "Big Grampa's" or "Big Gramma's" (not that I'm implying you have to be over a certain age) ;) Don't go selling a claim or claims that you love without reaching out to offer your knowledge.... I've lost both my Gramma and Grampa and it happened very shortly after they stopped doing things they loved (driving, getting out etc)... that time alongside the creek or the exercise it took to get there may be the reason some of us are still alive.

 

Please remember guys (and gals if there are any others on here), please don't be afraid to offer to trade your knowledge for someone's physical labor, muscles or just the feeling of safety by having another person with you..... until you're in a wheelchair, there's no need to give up something you love... and you have SO much to offer us newbies who know NOTHING about this in comparison..... helping move rocks or swing a shovel is grunt work, you're the ones with all of the 'valuable' knowledge to offer in exchange. :)

 

Now... to those of you who saw my wheelchair comment and thought that was an excuse, check this out:

 

 

 

Jennifer

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Yo, Jenn and all...I agree with your point about sharing knowledge completely...But, out of ignorance, I want to ask a question.....: Why, in this time of technology that allows a person to be in the depths of a gully and hit a speed dial to anyplace in the world to speak to whomever they want to...or send a text message and have an instant reply...Why would anyone still use shortwave????? As I prefaced my comment, there's obviously something I don't get and would deeply appreciate expanding my understanding on this point...Thanks...Cheers, Unc

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Yo, Jenn and all...I agree with your point about sharing knowledge completely...But, out of ignorance, I want to ask a question.....: Why, in this time of technology that allows a person to be in the depths of a gully and hit a speed dial to anyplace in the world to speak to whomever they want to...or send a text message and have an instant reply...Why would anyone still use shortwave????? As I prefaced my comment, there's obviously something I don't get and would deeply appreciate expanding my understanding on this point...Thanks...Cheers, Unc

 

Oh but Ron... :D I won't get into a debate here about HF vs cell phone because they both have their use (I couldn't live without my iPhone) but I will tell you this... I have 31 claims up here in British Columbia (link to my claim list) and on not ONE of my claims, do I have cell phone coverage. On all the backgrounds I travel on to get to them, I lose cell coverage at least 30 minutes before arriving at the claim. If I broke down or required assistance, I would be out of luck if I relied on either cell phone or old fashioned MTS (152mhz) radio telephone.

 

In fact if you look at this coverage map for my provider (Rogers), a large portion of the Province (what's called a State in the US) is not covered by cellular reception (this map is similar among all the providers here in BC). We're still pretty much bush country in a lot of the Province.

 

large.jpg

 

Now compare that to Arizona (all but the lightest in the picture which are this color icon_none.gifhave coverage), and you'll see the difference.

 

 

 

Each and every time that I go to my claims, I have backup power as well as a Yaesu FT-817ND HF Ham radio in the event that I break down or need assistance of any type. It's a real nice feeling knowing that if something happens, I can communicate. (I also carry a Yaesu VX-8R quad band VHF/UHF similar to what is shown in the below video).

 

I had a concealed weapons permit in Arizona (and just renewed it actually), up here it's REAL lonely in the bush with no gun AND no communications.

 

 

 

 

Back in August, in Northern BC, a man (an ex famous junior hockey coach) was lost for 4 days while out working on his claims. Had he had a simple HF radio along with a GPS, he'd have spent 3 of those days in front of his fireplace with a rum and coke in his hand instead of clinging to life with bears and cougars stalking him.

 

Article about Ernie being lost in the woods.

 

 

In Australian, there are vast areas that have no communications and HF radio is required if you want to stay in contact. In fact they have huge networks for this purpose: VKS737 Australian HF Radio and Radio Telephone Network

 

Jen

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most people going remote in Australia use an irridium sat phone. Hf was popular when sat phones were up around the six grand mark...but now sat phones are less than 2 grand......and VERY reliable.

 

HF is also good for people who don't want to spend $3.49 a minute to use a sat phone

 

Sat Phone Rates

 

Jennifer

 

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Ron, why do people go out and spend as much on a 70 year old deuce or pickup, when they could spend the same on a brand new one?

Why do people still buy, them ol 2100 and 2200's? when new ones have all the bells and whisels (sp?)? Cause, it works for them! :D

I'm not picking on you, but if something stupid should happen, cells and texting might not work, how could we get ahold of potholes and warn him?, other than with a ham radio?????

Going to bed, Shep

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Heck, I can't get a signal in Congress or Stanton with my Verizon wireless unless the moon and sun are lined up with stars! If I can get high enough on the East side of Rich Hill (probably about the 2,500-ft. level) I can get signal "most" of the time. I have been using little Motorola radios (line of sight) for years, and I always have one with me out in the boonies. Just my 2-cents! - Terry

 

Yo, Jenn and all...I agree with your point about sharing knowledge completely...But, out of ignorance, I want to ask a question.....: Why, in this time of technology that allows a person to be in the depths of a gully and hit a speed dial to anyplace in the world to speak to whomever they want to...or send a text message and have an instant reply...Why would anyone still use shortwave????? As I prefaced my comment, there's obviously something I don't get and would deeply appreciate expanding my understanding on this point...Thanks...Cheers, Unc

 

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Jim ... Old school stuff now! :unsure: No one knows how to make a camp fire let alone make smoke signals from it. Too many lpg and fuel stoves! :rolleyes: They say that is progress! :lol:

 

Mike F

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Funny thing happened to me the other day while detecting in a local park. I was walking along and listening to several people talking through my headset while using the X-Terra 705. Had some laughs and learned some things through this conversation. After a few hours I was on my way out of the park and noticed this pickup sitting with enough antenna's to speak to the mother ship. I pulled next to him and started a conversation with him and let him know I was able to listen to them. Pretty cool! Made my hunt even more interesting!

 

Phantom

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Back on target. How about this?

IMG_0244-Copy.jpg

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Jennifer,

 

 

So do you live in Arizona and travel to Canada or do you live in Canada and visit Arizona? Are Americans able to have claims in Canada? Just curious since I see you have a cwl for arizona, but also claims in Canada. You must be hardcore! And are you telling me that there are no rifles allowed in Canada? I love Shortwave, but fewer people are using this option unless they are way out in the wilderness and getting conversation these days is getting harder and harder to come by.

Mike

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Jennifer,

 

 

So do you live in Arizona and travel to Canada or do you live in Canada and visit Arizona? Are Americans able to have claims in Canada? Just curious since I see you have a cwl for arizona, but also claims in Canada. You must be hardcore! And are you telling me that there are no rifles allowed in Canada? I love Shortwave, but fewer people are using this option unless they are way out in the wilderness and getting conversation these days is getting harder and harder to come by.

Mike

 

Hi Mike, I live in Vancouver, BC. I use to live in Fountain Hills (just east of Phoenix/Scottsdale). I am a dual citizen (born in BC). Yes Americans can have claims here but they have to give any gold they find to the nearest 5'10" blond named Jennifer when they leave the country to go back to the USA.... NARF!!! yes, you can have claims here.

 

Re shortwave "way out in the wilderness" eh... well as I previously mentioned, there are several places that do not have cell coverage here but are not considered "way out in the wilderness" but se la vi....

 

Jen

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Jennifer,

 

 

So do you live in Arizona and travel to Canada or do you live in Canada and visit Arizona? Are Americans able to have claims in Canada? Just curious since I see you have a cwl for arizona, but also claims in Canada. You must be hardcore! And are you telling me that there are no rifles allowed in Canada? I love Shortwave, but fewer people are using this option unless they are way out in the wilderness and getting conversation these days is getting harder and harder to come by.

Mike

Must be rifles allowed in Canada.... if you fly wilderness there in the cold months, you are required to carry one in the plane (or at least they used to make you)

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Jen.

 

I have a Yaesu 757 and a coil of wire I carry with me in the camper.

It makes good communications from 150 miles from the closest town in Alaska to home.

Even when the northern lights are rolling VHF and UHF CW is fun for DX hounds when your tired of rolling around in the cold water. :lol:

 

 

Kurt

 

de wd9con

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Jennifer: thanks for the postings: I have been planning a extended trip of one or two years in the near future to B.C.

 

for prospecting and fishing Etc; and this information will certaintly help. The ham radio info will be

 

of great value to us..Thanks

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I got my ham license a long time ago before cell phones were common. (N7XPW) You remind me that I might need to renew... I spent a lot of time in the AZ wilderness by myself and found it to be a valuable tool and better company than most people. At east I could talk to people when I needed to but still be able to travel alone. Even though I rarely use it I still always take my 2m ht with me just in case.

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My son owns a Spot. I don't know if he's tried it. It seems like a solution to the problems mentioned here.

 

I bought a SPOT last year. It came in handy when my son didn't show up on time when he took the Ranger out for a ride. I started getting nervous just before dark so I just jumped on the SPOT website and I was able to see where he was, where he'd been, and where it looked like he was headed. I could see he was headed back toward his unloading spot so I knew he was ok. You can actually get them for free right now ($150) with the rebate if you sign up for service.

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The spot is a smart investment to carry if your going in the bush. It will save your life and also endless hours spent by the guys out there looking for you.

It's a $100. dollars well spend.

My Ham Radios are a good companion when you get back to camp in the evenings to contact your family and friends with pre set schedule.

 

Kurt

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