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Pilot Mark

Second Closest Find Next To A Nugget For Me

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Well, Montana use to say, when we use to hunt for gold together, that fishing and prospecting have a lot in common. They both can require a lot of patience, and persistence in order to achieve the objective. I know there are some like me out there, that live in parts of the country, where detecting for gold is almost impossible to do without planning for at least 2 to 3 days of being absent from home base. So this is my second, next thing for me to do for excitement next to finding nuggets. It keeps the searching, and patient levels in check, for the next gold hunt. However, the amount of fish caught within that period of time yesterday, makes me feel lucky that I'm going to do the same on a future gold hunt. That could always prove not to be the case, but attitude is one of the most important ingredience next to patience, and persistence that go hand in hand to be successful for both hobby's here. Detecting for gold can be thought of the advancement level for the required ingredience.

 

Mark

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...and I thought fishing was just an excuse to drink beer.

 

As "Pilot Mark" I assume you fly? What kind of aluminum do you drive?

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It is an excuse alright, but that is only if your down on fishermans luck, or getting the skunk, which makes it 100% legit. May also apply for prospecting to. Yesterday, I was so busy, I wouldn't have had time for a sip. :lol: Crappie, where I live, is like the fillet mignon for fish to eat. I take it, you are in Alaska? I enjoyed fishing there to. Little Sue Sittna, if I'm spelling it right, was a favorite fishing spot of mine for the long layovers.

 

I'm typed rated on the B-777,B757,B737,A320/21/19.

 

Mark

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mark. Nice filets there for sure. Fine eating!!! I'll get out if this darn wind will just quit. It was cold and windy , now it's warm and windy.----Bob

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There are places I have fished here in Alaska that the fishing is so good it gets boring. After a while of catching a fish on almost every cast you just want to stop for a rest, have a beer and watch the bears fish (or watch them steal fish from the fishermen). The Newhalen when the red salmon are running can be like that or the Chuitna with Silvers.

 

That's neat, you fly the heavy stuff. I have a little Cherokee Six. Actually, I think it's sold. I've got an earnest money check to hold it. I just don't fly it enough anymore. I'd take it out to my claims in Ruby, a six hour round trip, once or twice a year and very little else. Only flew 15 hours last year so I figure it would be cheaper to go commercial or rent.

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Hi Walt, You are definitely living in paradise. You are catch'n rather than fish'n. It must be getting close to prime time for the Kings to run. Do you make your own salmon jerky?

 

I used to own a Cessna-152. My son lost interest in flying it, and I got tired of flaring it high on landing, so I sold it. :lol: I would use the smaller aircraft my buddies owned for aerial prospecting when I lived in Arizona. I would use a hand held gps to mark out what I thought would be a good area to check out, then come back on foot after interfacing the cordinates on a terrain map. I didn't have much success that way, but it was fun trying to prospect from a birds eye view.

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Prospecting is a alot like fishing (except for the catch and release thrill of the chase) You have to figure out where the fish are how shallow or how deep what methood will work to get them out. Same as gold mining

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Mark

This is paradise for about three months out of the year. The older I get the less I like winter. I'm looking forward to retiring to Arizona (possibly next year) and doing some detecting in the desert. I hope to still spend the summers in Alaska working my claims if I can find enough gold to pay for the commute. Social security and what's left of my 401K wont take me vary far.

 

I never got into making jerky. I have smoked some fish. I rarely fish anymore but I've been thinking about getting back into it. When I turned 60 I received my free Alaska lifetime hunting, trapping, fishing license so I should probably use it. Though now that I'm selling the plane I wont have such easy access to the great fishing spots. Fishing anywhere near the Alaska road system sucks. Way too crowded. I have friends with airplanes that I could borrow but I wouldn't take a borrowed plane into the short dirt strips where I go with my own.

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Mark,

 

Nice patch of specks (crappys)! My poor fishing/hunting gear is abused. Seems nugget hunting ties fishing and hunting together for me like your talking about. What ever you enjoy, it's really being outdoors and enjoying yourself. Until the next hunt, be it a fish, turkey or gold!

 

LuckyLundy

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quote name='fishing8046' date='07 May 2010 - 07:09 AM' timestamp='1273241386' post='46052']

Prospecting is a a lot like fishing (except for the catch and release thrill of the chase) You have to figure out where the fish are how shallow or how deep what method will work to get them out. Same as gold mining

Yes, there are many similar denominators to these common hobbies/events here. Speaking of that, don't forget about Mothers Day this weekend, or we could all end up on the catch, and release end of fishing8046's comment above, and which we may have to add to this list of common denominators. :lol:

 

Mark

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Fishing, hunting , prospecting. If you don't enjoy the hunt you will give up quickly and move onto something else.----Bob

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Hi Bert,

 

Yes, I was using tube jigs. The white, yellow chartreuse colored jigs. If water clarity is low, which is common after a rain where I live, then I will use the darker colors like black,purple, or dark orange jigs.

Didn't use any floats. I caught a lot of small ones in 1 to 2 ft. of water. The larger fish have come off the spawn, and the smaller under developed crappie will usually come in the shallows after. The larger fish I caught was off the timbers, and brush piles between 9 to 12ft. of water. If I'm in the shallows around the button willows (small trees), or grasses, I run my 10 ft. rod inside of the brushy tree, and as close to the branch base as I can. You don't think that would be a good place to drop a jig in fear of getting the line tangled up, or breaking an eye off the pole while setting the hook, but that is where they are. I do a thing called short poling, where you never raise the rod up after feeling the bite with the line pinched in between the fingers of the free hand. Once you know the fish is caught, you pull that line out to the side, and drag the fish out of all that wicked brush on to the boat, or where ever. It works, and you won't get the line tangled up. We hill bellies always come up with new, and different ways to put the food on the table, except we don’t use telephone cranks, or dynamite anymore. Kidding

 

Forgive me gold buddies, I know I'm streching my boundry.

 

Mark

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Well, just one more note. I’ll say just one more thing to end my thread about the southerner techniques of fishing we used way back then, and which reminds me of a story that started at a high school reunion while sharing some trophy fish pictures with a buddy of mine I went to high school with. I won't say anymore after this. Well, he wanted to get together soon after reviewing the pictures I showed him of my last fishing trip. We were sharing our usual reunion topics of what we do for a living, and I discovered he worked for the Fish & Game department. I figured, since we grew up together, and all the pranks he pulled on me, that I owed him back for that. Well, I got the boat ready, and we were to meet at a lake boat ramp to start our fishing trip. Once we got out there, I pulled in to a cove, and stopped the boat in the middle of the cove. All of a sudden, he told me you forgot the poles, and we needed to go back. I didn’t know what to say at the time, so I reached over and handed him a fishing net with an extended pole to reach out with. I then proceeded to reach in the wooden box, and pull out a dynamite stick. I lit the fuse, waited till it burnt down to a reasonable length, then tossed it over the right side. Ka BOOM it went. I waited a few seconds, and the fish came raining down. The next thing you know, my buddy was yelling at me saying “Mark You Can’t do that, you are breaking the law boy. Jiminy cricket, I was a little scared at first, but thinking he would eventually participate along with me after he loaded some big fish up. I then reached into the wooden box again, pulled another dynamite stick out. Lit it, and waited till it burnt down to a reasonable length, then tossed it over my left side. Ka BOOM. A second later, more fish started raining down from the sky. At that point, he told me he was sorry, and that I had to head back to the boat ramp, and I would be arrested, and prosecuted. From there on out, I knew I was going to be in trouble if he would not participate, so I then, quickly reached in the wooden box, grabbed another dynamite stick. Lit it. Waited till it burnt down to a reasonable length, handed it to him, grabbed my camera, and said. “Now here boy, are you going to b**** now, are ya go’n to fish.

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