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montanagold59635

Got a full weekend of coin hunting in

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not a bad couple days, good job man

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Montanagold,

 

That is a real good weekend of detecting! :) Congrats on some really cool finds. In the left is some sort of medalion that has two children, maybe on a teeter-totter. Any idea what that is?

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Nice haul!

 

However I just want to note that cleaning the silver coins severely reduces their value to collectors. That standing liberty quarter would be worth about $140 retail if all you did was carefully wash off the loose dirt. As is its probably worth about $70 retail after the cleaning. With more valuable coins the reduction in value can be even more extreme.

 

Chris Ralph

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not sure what it is Chris, looks like it may have been a pendant.

I cleaned the SLQ up with just a little soap and water, there is not a scratch on it. All circulated coins are considered junk by collectors, and I never plan on selling my coins anyway. Its more about the hunt, I enjoy finding gold nuggets but the amount of different things you pull out when coin hunting is much more exciting to me. HH

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Nice haul! That 1904 watch fob is really cool. Regardless of value I enjoy seeing the named & date stamped relics!

 

Joe Kauffman

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Hi HH -

 

All circulated coins are considered junk by collectors

 

Thats not really true - I sold a buffalo nickel that was circulated and dug with a metal detector in the Nevada desert for $1,700 - and the colletor who bought it was dang happy to buy it! Thats no small chunk of change. ;)

 

Some Carson City "CC" mint circulated coins can be worth tens of thousands depending on their condition.

 

Even though there is not a scratch on it, the cleaned color of the quarter is what knocks the value off - to a collector it looks cleaned (but loads of scratches would of course make it even worse). I am not trying in any way to give you a hard time, just an education as to the value. Even if you never sell it, none of us lives forever on this earth, and your son, daughter or grandchild might sell it in the future, and they might prefer to get the maximum amount of money for it when they sell.

 

Chris

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Hi HH -

 

 

 

Thats not really true - I sold a buffalo nickel that was circulated and dug with a metal detector in the Nevada desert for $1,700 - and the colletor who bought it was dang happy to buy it! Thats no small chunk of change. ;)

 

Some Carson City "CC" mint circulated coins can be worth tens of thousands depending on their condition.

 

Even though there is not a scratch on it, the cleaned color of the quarter is what knocks the value off - to a collector it looks cleaned (but loads of scratches would of course make it even worse). I am not trying in any way to give you a hard time, just an education as to the value. Even if you never sell it, none of us lives forever on this earth, and your son, daughter or grandchild might sell it in the future, and they might prefer to get the maximum amount of money for it when they sell.

 

Chris

Chris, I know this thread is kinda old, but I just stumbled across it.

Are you saying that gentle cleaning with soap and water will reduce the value of a coin?

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No, if you are gentle with the soap and water tht should be no problem. Take a look at the photos - the finder dipped the coins in something or did them up with silver cleaner. Thats what should not be done. Natural old coins dont look like that. Collectors want coins that look natural, not polished and all shiny bright. Yes, you want to get the loose dirt off them, but the natural toning should not be disturbed unless you an experienced coin collector and really, really know exactly what you are doing. The standing liberty coin pictured above is still a nice piece, but would have been more valuable with its original toning. I only posted my comment not to criticize this guy, but to let detector operators know that with a some rare circulated coins, you can knock a few hundred to several thousands of dollars off the value of your find by agressivly cleaing them with silver polish, silver dip cleaners, turtle wax, etc.

 

Chris

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That's great info, Chris. Thanks a bunch. :)

Dwight

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Those coins are as they came out, just a little soap and H2o, no polish or chemicals of any kind. Dug coins are considered circulated and yes they are worth money but when you send them in to be graded then you find out the value. Sure you don't want to go cleaning your coins with a wire brush and harsh chemicals but if you sent in an 1885 V nick that needed to be graded that was dug out of the ground it would be graded as corroded, trust me Ive done it. It has been assumed that I cleaned it with silver cleaner even though I stated how it was cleaned. Oh well doesn't matter I don't sell my stuff any way. Happy hunting

 

 

 

 

 

Here is some more recent juice from the ground.

post-965-129671285289_thumb.jpg

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