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This was found in Eldorado county,California.......This nugget was in a seasonal drainage in an area that was heavily mined and mined again.It sounded just like a rusty nail.Nothing smooth and sweet about this one. Found with a sd2100 and double D coil on top of bedrock. I dont know how they missed this one ...........But im sure glad they did, Its a little over 9 ounces

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WTG Hangtown!

 

Savor the moment, for those nine-ouncers don't come around too often; the one I unearthed several years ago (also with an SD2100 BTW) sounded just like the horseshoe I had dug up the hill from it...the lesson here is: even if you're one hundred percent sure a target is going to be trash, dig it anyway. Thanks for reminding us, albeit impressively!

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Hangtown . Fantastic find!!!! and you and lunk are right , you just can't tell a really big nugget from a horseshoe by the sound no matter how well you've trained your ear . Even the best discriminating detectors would probably fail that test.----Bob

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Did any of these larger targets have a low-high signal on the SD2100?

 

All of the gold I have dug has been a high-low signal on the SD2100V2, even large multiounce nuggets.

All low-high signals have been iron trash but sometimes I wonder if I am passing up an unusual big one.

 

-Don

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Did any of these larger targets have a low-high signal on the SD2100?

 

All of the gold I have dug has been a high-low signal on the SD2100V2, even large multiounce nuggets.

All low-high signals have been iron trash but sometimes I wonder if I am passing up an unusual big one.

 

-Don

 

Hey Don,

 

I'll tell you a little story that may save you some time with the learning curve: when I first started using my SD2100, like you it didn't take me long to notice that the nuggets gave a high-low signal and iron trash gave the low-high. This proved to be very beneficial in hydraulic pits where there are tons of square nails that go low-high. It was also quite handy on the Havasu Goldseekers claims, which are riddled with 30 and 50 caliber bullets and shell casings from the 1940's; the bullets have a steel core, so the 50's make a down pitch as do the casings. The 30's however, make an unusual up-down-up signal as they are passed over. So the only up signals were either nuggets or 30 casings, as well as small lead and ferrous bits, of course. So I went merrily along digging only the up targets and ignoring the downs...until that is, I met a certain lady at Gold Basin who had just found a one pound nugget; I asked her if I could please pass over it with my detector, since I'd never found a multi-ouncer and would like to hear what one sounded like. Imagine my surprise (as well as horror) when, depending on the orientation of the nugget, I could make it sound just like a 50 caliber and even the weird up-down-up response of a 30 bullet, not to mention the normal high-low signal. That was a real eye-opening turning point for me, and from then on I've dug everything. Without that encounter, I probably would not have dug my 9-ouncer which BTW gave a low-high signal. I still wonder how many monster nuggets I passed on in those early days! :(

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Hey Don,

 

I'll tell you a little story that may save you some time with the learning curve: when I first started using my SD2100, like you it didn't take me long to notice that the nuggets gave a high-low signal and iron trash gave the low-high. This proved to be very beneficial in hydraulic pits where there are tons of square nails that go low-high. It was also quite handy on the Havasu Goldseekers claims, which are riddled with 30 and 50 caliber bullets and shell casings from the 1940's; the bullets have a steel core, so the 50's make a down pitch as do the casings. The 30's however, make an unusual up-down-up signal as they are passed over. So the only up signals were either nuggets or 30 casings, as well as small lead and ferrous bits, of course. So I went merrily along digging only the up targets and ignoring the downs...until that is, I met a certain lady at Gold Basin who had just found a one pound nugget; I asked her if I could please pass over it with my detector, since I'd never found a multi-ouncer and would like to hear what one sounded like. Imagine my surprise (as well as horror) when, depending on the orientation of the nugget, I could make it sound just like a 50 caliber and even the weird up-down-up response of a 30 bullet, not to mention the normal high-low signal. That was a real eye-opening turning point for me, and from then on I've dug everything. Without that encounter, I probably would not have dug my 9-ouncer which BTW gave a low-high signal. I still wonder how many monster nuggets I passed on in those early days! :(

 

 

Thanks Lunk, I am going to start digging those low-high signals again. On the SD2100, I think that low-high signal must start close to the 10 ounce

size depending on the physical orientation of the nugget. I tried my detector on a 10 ounce nugget once but it still gave a high-low signal but it was laying flat. I never tried the 10 ouncer on edge. (It was my friends nugget so I didn't get to play with it for long.)

 

I too am wondering how many large nuggets I have passed up.

 

-Don

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Don,

 

I'm sure the low-high response is dependent on several factors, including the size, thickness, internal voids and/or minerals like quartz, density, etc. of the nugget, as well as its orientation. I once had an opportunity to swing over a thick, solid five-ounce nugget with my SD2100 and it also gave a low-high response. At any rate, it certainly does take a much larger lump of gold to make a "down noise" on the SD series than it does on the GP and GPX series detectors. One thing is for sure though...digging more of those down noise targets will definitely increase your odds of finding a BIG ONE. Good luck out there! :)

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Lunk, Montana & Don,

 

Great comments on the large nuggets response for the SD, GP & GPX units. That is a beauty that Hangtown found. I also had the opportunity to swing my GPX 4k with a 14 NFE Mono over a plus 3oz gold & quartz nugget (chucky shape) as well as a solid 1 oz nugget(thick & flat) that came out of pushes at Ganes Creek. Both nuggets sounded off low-high on the ground surface and were very really loud!! Other nuggets found that were 3/4 oz and under gave the classic high-low response. It just goes to show you that you should dig all targets even when you find trash (bits of wire, bullets, bits tin, shell casings, etc) in either the high-low or low-high target respones....Tyrie

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To complicate things further, with the GP and more so with the GPXs you have timings choices. Several years ago I gave a talk at one of the AZO outings at Stanton where I demonstrated how a nugget as small as 2 grams gave a low/high signal with the timings set in SENSITIVE / EXTRA timing but switching to NORMAL timing that same nugget gave a high/low signal. I demonstrated this with a number of nuggets that I had found over the years and saved because of the strange signal flip flop. Some of the larger , flat ones would flip flop depending on the orientation even though none of the settings had been changed. Here in Ca I've found myself detecting in a much trashier environment than I was used to in AZ and Nevada. Some of those places you just have to rely on your gut feeling or as some do, put on a DD coil and really learn how to use the Minelab PI discriminator. I have seen some folks do quite well with it although I believe a large target near the surface would produce unreliable results. There really is only one way to be absolutely sure.----Bob

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Well, crap........Now I have a few patches I have to go back to that had low=high signals that I was (am) sure were rusty bits of can or ? ... I do remember an ouncer+ that I found that gave confusing signals but had nice small gold nuggets... I hunted a new gully with DD NF round coil a couple days ago that yielded a butt load of .22 casings deep...really deep...I'm getting confused Cheers, Yer Unc in the Dubyah

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Montana,

 

You are right great comment again. I think I was at that AZO Outing that year. Also, I have always wanted to use the DD coils with the GPX 4K but with the sensitve/smooth timings on the GPX 4K and a mono coil I have a better comfort.....Tyrie

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Hangtown,

You mentioned hunting the Havasu Goldseekers claims. I am a member but never been there yet.

Will I be ok with just a Suburban 2WD? What kind of luck have you had there? I have searched the Franconia

area for meteorites a couple times and know what you mean about the bullets/casings. But also a lot of magnetite that I thought were meteorites. I'd like to go there soon but I'd be either alone or with one of my kids so I don't want to get stuck somewhere. I'm curious if you go there often and if these rains cause trouble. I have gone waterskiing at Havasu for years, just never looked for gold there...

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Hangtown,

 

One hell of a nugget! Your correct "Dig them all and let the scoop sort them out" Congrats!!!

 

LuckyLundy

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Hangtown,

 

That is a spectacular, incredible find. Way to go!! You knocked it out of the park with that find.

 

As others have commented on the switch from low to high or high to low, I'll go on record as saying that I learned a long time ago to forget about the tone when I'm in good nugget ground and just dig everything. Is it a huge pain? Absolutely! Have I found nuggets I'd have left behind? Absolutely--they've sounded exactly like round nails, pieces of tin cans, etc.

 

I just dig it all--with one exception. When I was new at this, I was in an area that was full of nuggets--all in bedrock. I got this high low sound (I refer to it as high-low-high) which was completely different from the sound of the 24 nuggets I'd dug that day. They were all low high (low-high-low), and this one was very loud, and it was deep. Now remember, that it was in bedrock, and all the other nuggets had been chiseled out of the bedrock that day.

 

Well, I started chiseling, and it was hot, sweaty work, the bugs were bad, I was tired from digging all day. I got down about six inches, and it was still loud, but very wrong, and so I convinced myself that it had to be ground mineralization (the bedrock was red-hot graphite schist). Therefore, I quit digging, we found another patch in a different area, and so on . . . and in a couple of years when I visited the site again, it had all been reclaimed! The chance to see what it really was--gone forever.

 

What do I think about that sound today? I think from what I've learned since that nuggets can pretty much sound off whichever way they want, I made a huge mistake as they were taking nuggets out of that excavation that were well over an ounce, and from what I know now, I think it was the mistake of a lifetime. (The other nuggets I dug were all multi-gram nuggets [2g and up), and so it's very possible it was a large, deep nugget. I still wake up in a cold-sweat sometimes.

 

All the best,

 

Lanny

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